Um...Quinn's Cousin, or Somebody

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Posts tagged with "fandom"

ladysaviours:

sea-change:

e’rybody’s all like “fandom’s where i found community and understanding and happiness’

and i’m in the corner like “fandom’s where i found my high blood pressure and an insatiable urge for murder”

  

peace-out-little-munchkins:

troyethehotboy18:

sorry to break it to you all but being a fan of someone is not a competition, in competitions there are losers and winners, but in a fandom there are only losers and it’s all of us

THIS IS GOLDEN

  • i do not ship the fandom's main ship: a lesson in agony
  • I shipped the popular ship and they're all doing it wrong: a lesson in uncomfortable annoyance
  • I fucking hate the fandom's main ship: a lesson in barely contained fury
Aug 1

Do you ever think you'll stop drawing fanart? No offense it just seems like the kind of thing you're supposed to grow out of. I'm just curious what your plans/goals are since it isn't exactly an art form that people take seriously.

Anonymous

talesfromthemek:

linzeestyle:

euclase:

Ah, fanart. Also known as the art that girls make.

Sad, immature girls no one takes seriously. Girls who are taught that it’s shameful to be excited or passionate about anything, that it’s pathetic to gush about what attracts them, that it’s wrong to be a geek, that they should feel embarrassed about having a crush, that they’re not allowed to gaze or stare or wish or desire. Girls who need to grow out of it.

That’s the art you mean, right?

Because in my experience, when grown men make it, nobody calls it fanart. They just call it art. And everyone takes it very seriously.

It’s interesting though — the culture of shame surrounding adult women and fandom. Even within fandom it’s heavily internalized: unsurprisingly, mind, given that fandom is largely comprised by young girls and, unfortunately, our culture runs on ensuring young girls internalize *all* messages no matter how toxic. But here’s another way of thinking about it.

Sports is a fandom. It requires zealous attention to “seasons,” knowledge of details considered obscure to those not involved in that fandom, unbelievable amounts of merchandise, and even “fanfic” in the form of fantasy teams. But this is a masculine-coded fandom. And as such, it’s encouraged - built into our economy! Have you *seen* Dish network’s “ultimate fan” advertisements, which literally base selling of a product around the normalization of all consuming (male) obsession? Or the very existence of sports bars, built around the link between fans and community enjoyment and analysis. Sport fandom is so ingrained in our culture that major events are treated like holidays (my gym closes for the Super Bowl) — and can you imagine being laughed at for admitting you didn’t know the difference between Supernatural and The X Files the way you might if you admit you don’t know the rules of football vs baseball, or basketball?

"Fandom" is not childish but we live in a culture that commodified women’s time in such away that their hobbies have to be "frivolous," because "mature" women’s interests are supposed to be marriage, family, and overall care taking: things that allow others to continue their own special interests, while leaving women without a space of their own.

So think about what you’re actually saying when you call someone “too old” for fandom. Because you’re suggesting they are “too old” for a consuming hobby, and I challenge you to answer — what do you think they should be doing instead?

Oh look, a non-ship related fandom questionnaire. Do you love it? I do. Have people send you numbers, answer the questions. It’s fun for the whole family.

makebreakfastcanon:

1. Favorite one-off episode of any series.
2. Favorite villain
3. Least favorite “main character” of a show
4. Favorite “sidekick”
5. Character you love to hate.
6. Favorite friendship
7. Friendship that never felt real to you.
8. Favorite wise-guy/jokester character
9. Least favorite villain
10 Least favorite season long storyline
11. Talk about a character with a bad story or character arc.
12. Character that just pisses you off no matter how much you try to like them.
13. Plot device used too much in your favorite shows
14. Favorite character death scene
15. An abandoned or unanswered plot line that will always bug you.

bau-badasses:

image

mcgarrygirl78 replied to your post: Everyone’s still hoping for Paget to c…

Just because certain fans dont like JLH doesnt mean they’re “hating”. I’ve actually thought she was a bad actress since Party of Five and am unimpressed with the idea of her on CM. I should be able to express that as much as those who are stoked.

Excuse me, did I say not liking her equaled hating her? No, I did not so don’t make assumptions, twist my words, or put words into my mouth. I was specifically talking about those who hate her already. I’m not overly excited about her (I don’t hate her though) but I’m giving her a chance. Which is something I’m asking everyone to do. Not liking her is fine. Give her a chance. And if not then at least don’t hate on her. 

No, you did say stop hating. grow up.  Those were your words exactly.  And I’m just saying that just because someone expresses dislike, even intense, of the actress or even the character (though they havent seen her yet) that doesnt mean they’re “hating”.  We just end up policing each other so often in fandom, and dont get me wrong because I think things often get out of control (the insanity with Alex/Jeanne made me sick and most likely lead to her exit). 

All I’m saying is that fans dont have to give JLH a chance, dont have to like anything at all about her casting, and there are ways to express that without being visceral, disrespectful of those who do like it (or are waiting before they judge), or anything of the sort.  I know a lot of people dont do that and I know you were speaking to those specifically but its a fine line to tread when we start attempting to censoring others and censoring ourselves not to incur the wrath of others. 

We all have a right to express our feelings, positive or otherwise, on a show we all love or loved deeply at one time.  I just think sometimes the “dont you dare start complaining” crowd can be just as out of control as the “I’m totally gonna complain about this” crowd.  Respect of everyone’s opinion, even those I dont agree with or like, as long as its given with respect is really important to me as a fan and a person.

It wasnt my intent to start a fight, I completely respect what you have to say and who you’re saying it to.  I just wonder sometimes how the conversation might be different in fandoms if we asked each other why more, opened dialogues, instead of all picking up weapons and taking vastly opposite sides.

coolghost:

tv show. white man. hes sad. he has to do important thing but its hard. his girlfriend died probably. TWSIT!! theres another white man. maybe MORE. hes sad too but for different reason. its very deep probably. theyre best friends but not gay but maybe they are haha fandom!!! every girl dies or goes away. just not gay white man friend. 10 seasons 100 million viewers. what will moody white men do this week.

solunais:

Never in my life have I ever seen a more accurate description of fandoms

(Source: thecatbureau)

phosphorescent-naidheachd:

saltsister:

canon-autopsy:

saltsister:

Reasons why i dislike slash shipping in fandoms:

White boys over everything. Every. Single. Time. No time for pocs not even interracial slash. Erasure and villainization of female characters. Especially woc. Using women as props for your white boys fantasy. Faux feminism. Strong women! Needs no love!

I don’t think people realize how important poc/interracial ships are. Slash, femslash, even hetero, yes, hetero. We get so little representation already so excuse me if i don’t appreciate your erasure (hate) of pocs characters/ships to prop your ship.

agreed. this is a problem.

but the problem occurs not because of fans, but because of writers. white men are written interesting, multi-layered, and dynamic. their relaionships (mostly friendships) get the most screen time and focus. white men are usually the fan’s focus because they’re near always the writers’ focus.

with a few exceptions, women are generally used as props by the writers. women of color and people of color in general are shoved in the back seat. representation matters and we desperately need more of it from the writers.

to use sherlock as an example, i don’t think its fans’ fault that few people care about Donovan. i think she’s the only named poc and one of the very few women. even Anderson got a larger role later on than she did! sherlock, john, greg, mycroft, and even anderson are infinitely more fleshed out and that is the problem.

more solid representation of poc, women, and other minorities in media, as actual characters instead of props

while this is partly true  i still feel that most fans have yet to acknowledge and take responsibility of the hate and backlash they themselves contributed to poc characters in fandoms.  writers are to be blamed for poorly written poc characters yes but it does not give fandoms  the excuse to use this as a reasons to justify their hate/dislike towards these characters.

 Also most fandoms does not even acknowledge the problematic writing, their hate is automatically directed to the character just for simply existing especially more so when it threatens their ship. And in this case, the popular ones in fandoms : white hetero and slash ships.

i believe it’s more than a matter of which character has been given more depth and dynamic. because if not how then do you explain the hate directed towards poc characters with strong writing? Characters such as Martha of Doctor Who,  Marie Laveau of AHS, Gwen of Merlin, Jessica Pearson of Suits? 

i just … it’s hard enough to enjoy a show with so few good depictions of minorities but when you are unable to have a safe space to appreciate undervalued and underwritten characters without coming across hate it gets frustrating. 

All of this!

Let’s not forget that fandom will happily create backstories and justifications for their white male faves at the drop of a hat, but refuses to even try to imagine why women, POC, and WOC characters might act the way that they do.

Fandom is happy to ship white male characters that have barely canonically interacted (see: Mycroft/Lestrade, Clint/Coulson (in the MCU), etc.), but eagerly tears down canonical relationships that have been developed onscreen that involve WOC (particularly if they’re black) (see: Arthur/Gwen, Spock/Uhura (Nu!Trek), etc.), and disproportionately demonizes those women. Not to mention the fact that fandom rarely considers shipping POC with their close onscreen friends, and when people do, loudly wonders why “they can’t just be friends” and complains about how the POC character “doesn’t need a love interest” (see: Tony/Rhodey, Ichabod/Abbie, etc.). Compare this to fandom’s treatment of white characters who are close friends, or even siblings (ex: John/Sherlock, Dean/Sam, etc.)!

I don’t deny that the media has a lot of issues and could definitely do with giving POC/WOC/women more focus and development, but that isn’t the entire issue here. Fandom is culpable for its own actions as much as the source material is.

I don’t have anything against white dudeslash in and of itself — I’ve read some excellent stories, I get the draw for shipping certain characters together, and I definitely understand the desire for representation — but as a fanbase/genre in general, it tends to treat characters that aren’t white men very poorly.

I had something to say but this person said it much better than I ever could and hit the nail straight on the head so I copied and bolded for emphasis.  Women are often crushed by fandom, which seems insane since so many fandoms are majority women.  And black women dont stand a damn chance (nor do other non-white women). So there are definitely questions of racism and misogyny that need to, but will probably never, be addressed.

Fandom is happy to ship white male characters that have barely canonically interacted (see: Mycroft/Lestrade, Clint/Coulson (in the MCU), etc.), but eagerly tears down canonical relationships that have been developed onscreen that involve WOC (particularly if they’re black) (see: Arthur/Gwen, Spock/Uhura (Nu!Trek), etc.), and disproportionately demonizes those women. Not to mention the fact that fandom rarely considers shipping POC with their close onscreen friends, and when people do, loudly wonders why “they can’t just be friends” and complains about how the POC character “doesn’t need a love interest” (see: Tony/Rhodey, Ichabod/Abbie, etc.). Compare this to fandom’s treatment of white characters who are close friends, or even siblings (ex: John/Sherlock, Dean/Sam, etc.)!

Jul 7

blackgirlnerds:

the-goddamazon:

"How The Fandom Made Me Hate That Thing I Used To Love" A Memoir

Sigh, sometimes, yes. this.